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European Stereotype by Hillfighter European Stereotype by Hillfighter
The European Stereotype by Hillfighter

The stereotype is a very nuanced tool. It is the means by which large groups of people are categorized quickly. It can be either positive or negative. The most effective ones are easily understood and funny, the worst lead to confusion and audiences scratching their heads.

In a sense the national stereotype is a matter of national pride. A well-developed stereotype means that your county matters, whereas an obscure stereotype means that your country is too obscure. To that end, I will now speak about the five major countries of Europe, the main stereotyped countries of England, France, Germany, Russia and Italy. Why these five? Because these nations are the movers and shakers of Europe and the World, they comprise its most economically productive and militarily powerful countries. These countries are also the movers and shakers of America, the principal maker of stereotypes.

Most stereotypes come straight out of Hollywood. They represent the accumulated media of what an American audience believes to be true. Things like ‘it always rains in London’, ‘the French like to eat bread and drink wine’, ‘German automobiles are well made’, ‘Russians are tall’ or ‘Italians love to sing’. Yet some of these stereotypes also predate Hollywood; Americans have known how dreary London is since the colonial days. But Hollywood gave these ideas new life though better media, through the medium of the movie American stereotypes have been transmitted worldwide and preserved forever in celluloid film.

I have used several images courtesy of Fotosearch in order to better illustrate my points. I choose these images because they are non-offensive, generic and generally accepted. These images work because we could all identify the German quickly and it’s always funny that he’s wearing lederhosen.

One last point I want to make before I begin is that stereotypes are often not so much about countries as a whole as they are about specific urban populations within those countries. These urban populations usually (but not always) reside in the national capital.

-The English-

So, lets begin with the earliest stereotype in the American pantheon, the Englishman. Looking at the image above we see that he’s wearing a bowler hat, a fine suit and carrying either a cane or an umbrella. The Englishman looks to be a refined and civilized gentleman. But he is also more a Londoner than anything else. Frankly, when most Americans go to England they never leave London; thus creating stereotypes for Manchester or Birmingham is fairly pointless (the exception here is Liverpool, land of the Beatles). So the English stereotype has to match limited tourist experience in order to be effective.

The Englishman is also complicated by the fact that he is the most American of all Europeans (this might seem like backward logic considering that England created America, but it should be noted that Rapprochement was and is a two way street). As a more famous person has said, America and England are two countries divided by a common language. But it’s not so much what you say as how you say it; the English accent is often the butt of many jokes. Other jokes revolve around the English love for monarchy, tea and scones. There is a subtle form of mockery in portraying the English as tea drinkers. Why? Because it’s India tea and we all know damn well how they got it. In that sense then the English appear as bastard Imperialists, Americas reflection in the historical mirror. Perhaps the subtlety reflects America’s ambivalence towards its own modern empire.

Because of America is so close to England (in a cultural sense), much attention is given to those other peoples in the British Isles: the Irish and the Scots. The Irish are big based on numbers alone, at this point more people of Irish descent live in the US than Ireland itself. Most came to America during the great potato famine. Because there were so many of them they produced perhaps the richest wealth of stereotype jokes of any people on earth. Bottom line: being perpetually drunk will provide the most lulz, which is the grist of stereotypes. The Scots are well known for more simple reasons: the movie Braveheart and golf. Americans can distinguish between the English, the Scots and the Irish because their division reflects one of the oldest American cultural divisions, namely that between the WASPs (White Anglo Saxon Protestants) and the Hillbillies of Appalachia. Many WASPs are the descendents of English colonists who came to New England back in the 1700s. By contrast the Hillbillies are the descendents of the Scots-Irish, Protestant settlers from the Scotland England border settled by Oliver Cromwell in Ireland to fight the Catholic Irish. Many eventually left for America but were pushed by the established colonists to Appalachia, the edge of the colonies to fight the Indians. They have remained there unto this day.

-The French-

France is a moody place and the French are a moody people; or to be more precise, Paris is a moody place and the Parisians are a moody people. To most Americans France is Paris and the rest of the country might as well not exist. Not that the rest of France is bad, it’s just that we never go there, we’re constantly saying ‘I hear the south of France is nice this time of year’ because all we have is hearsay.

So let’s examine the Frenchman. He’s not as well dressed as the Englishman, which reflects the fact that his per capita income is lower. He’s playing an accordion, an obvious reference to Musette. His cap marks him out as a painter, a reference to the great painters Cézanne, Renoir, Gauguin, Matisse, Degas, Van Gogh, Monet and Manet as well as to the Louvre, a museum containing all the artwork Napoleon plundered from across Europe in addition to the holy grail. The barstool the Frenchman is standing on is a reference to the bistro, the sort of rustic restaurant establishment the Parisians love to eat at.

The French are known for their food, which is both praised and derided at the same time. The French can turn a ham sandwich into a culinary work of art, but they also eat frog’s legs. Beyond this is the nutritional mystery of the French Paradox: that the French eat more butter, more pork, more saturated fat than Americans and still have a statistically lower heart attack rate. This paradox exists in the minds of Americans because we’re busy examining our own diet with mathematical precision in order to try to discover the root cause of obesity (while science isn’t the best way to determine what to eat, at least science along with immigration allows the American culinary arts to consistently outdo those of the English).

France has a special place in the American heart. It is was and is our oldest ally. It’s our twin, conceived in Liberty and birthed by Revolution. And though there are disagreements, it must be said that both American and French government is propelled by an idealism that’s just not seen in other countries.

There is a popular misconception that the French hate America and that they are ungrateful for American military help in World Wars One and Two. But that’s a rerendering of facts. Parisians seem to hate Americans because they hate what we all hate: mobs of tourists. Specifically, mobs of tourists who don’t speak your language, but rather speak the language of that country that yours has despised for the past eight centuries. Most Americans take it for granted that they can travel halfway around the world and encounter English speaking peoples (courtesy of the British Empire and Co). But though American tourists act pretentiously wherever they go, they really don’t act much worse than the British tourists did during the days of Empire. Perhaps this is what the French really hate, that nothing ever changes and one English speaking Imperialist has simply been replaced by another.

The nation of France also carries sexual connotations (after all the Marquis de Sade was a Frenchman). This can be seen clearly in the costume of the French Maid, an English invention that Americans simply accept as French. Due to the country's shaky military record (WW2) France is sometimes portrayed as an effeminate country (as opposed to more industrious, militarily strong countries like England, America and Germany which epitomize the masculine principle, or more gender balanced national characters like Russia or Italy which epitomize neither). The Moulin Rouge and the Cancan provide much better stereotype material because these events were actually made by Parisians for Parisians. But after all, Paris is the city of love.

-The Germans-

To the American, there are at least two Germanys. One is Naziland, the other is Beerland. Naziland is the country that either you or your father or your grandfather defeated in World War Two. It is the D-Day landing fought and refought again and again movie by movie. It is a terrible place of inhuman cruelty and brutal efficiency made all the more horrible by the fact that it actually existed. If ever there was a time when America fought an honorable war, this was it.

Luckily however, there is another Germany, Beerland. Ok, it’s actually called Bavaria and its most important city is Munich. Looking at the image above we see the German dressed for either Oktoberfest, to retell the story of Hansel and Gretel or to yodel. Either way, it’s the sort of ridiculous clothing that only a drunken man would walk around in. But this fits perfectly because Munich is known for its beer as well as its beer halls and beer gardens (yes my friends, in Germany, one gardens with beer). German cuisine is essentially beer food; endless varieties of sausage and the most kickass vegetable of all, sauerkraut.

The Beerland image harkens to old as well as new. It’s the stereotype of the German immigrant community in America perhaps best exemplified by Adolf Coors. It’s also the Germany that America occupied during the Cold War. This Germany is also especially loved because of BMW (Bavarian Motor Works) and their amazingly fast cars that go so well with the Autobahn, a freeway with no speed limits.

The mental division of Germany into good Germany/ bad Germany allows Americans to understand how the same country that pioneered space flight also planned the Holocaust. Thus it allows Americans to both love Germany and hate Germany at the same time. The mental picture is even more complicated because the Naziland Germans can be divided into Hitlers and Rommels, essentially dividing between truly evil Nazis and regular men who fought the war for their country, right or wrong. This is again a reflection of America, Rommel is typecast in the same role as Robert E. Lee, a great man fighting for his country regardless of its evils, an enemy that we can respect.

-The Russians-

Just as England is London and France is Paris, Russia is Moscow. So, above we see the Muscovite, wearing a fur cap and a fur coat. The fur is a reference to Siberia which traditionally made most of its income off the fur trade. It also illustrates that ironclad rule ‘Russia is a cold country’. That coldness seems to soak into the bones, giving even Russian Americans in Florida a cold attitude about life.

Almost the entire American knowledge of Russia comes from the Cold War via James Bond. But that British agent has more than a pen-laser up his sleeve. When it comes to Russia, the British have always had an axe to grind. Even back in the time of Catherine the Great, there were rumors that the Russians Tzars were planning to take over the whole world. The main cause of anxiety for the English was the Great Game, a series espionage missions and military adventures the British undertook in Central Asia to prevent a possible Russian invasion of India. The Russian Revolution added the new ideological element of Communism to British fears of Russian world conquest (the irony is palpable). This fear eventually got passed on to America via Winston Churchill in his Iron Curtain speech.

Russia completes the image of the Cold War as a chess game played across the world with the lesser countries as pawns to the grander schemes of Russia and America. They are the cold calculating opponent, the clever enemy. Their best gadgets evidence this genius, the T-34 tank and the AK-47 assault rifle, now famous worldwide, as well as their mildly successful space program. But there’s also a element of duplicity in their game as evidenced by their spy network which successfully stole the plans for the Hydrogen bomb.

There’s also certain uneasiness in playing against the Russians generated by the fact that they seem too foreign even by European standards. Napoleon had said that ‘if you scratch a Russian, you will wound a Tatar’ which seems to say that Russians are prideful and quick to anger. The truth is that Russia has always been different; the largest Orthodox Christian nation, the strongest Slavic country and the belief in the Tzars that Russia would be the third Rome. These are beliefs which weren't (and still aren’t) understood by many Americans back in the 50’s who were mostly Protestant and of an Anglo-Saxon mindset. It brings up the fundamental question, how can we fight an enemy we don’t understand? It’s easy to hate what we can’t understand, but we can’t defeat an enemy with hate alone. Consequently there is an element of mystery in the Russian character, somewhere past the vodka and the cold, that makes the Russian the worthy adversary that they are.

-The Italians-

This is probably one of the more complicated stereotypes because of the sources involved. Americans know the Italians the same way they know the Irish, by immigration. The Italian stereotype was handcrafted on the streets of Little Italy in New York City. Although Neapolitans did not represent the majority of Italian immigrants to America, they did do the most to create what Americans know today as Italian food. Pizza, it’s Neapolitan. Same with spaghetti and meatballs, though they aren’t combined until they get to America. All that red marinara sauce, Neapolitan. That Neapolitan ice cream sandwich you ordered, guess where it comes from? And the influence of Naples on American sensibilities doesn’t end with food. The songs Funicili, Funicula and O Solo Mio are featured in many American movies (O Solo Mio was even used as the Italian national anthem at the 1920 Olympics).

But, there are other Italies to consider. The gondolier in the image above represents Venice. But few Americans can tell you what the Venetians eat (Risotto) or anything about their city beyond the canals (Carnival).

Without a doubt the best-known city in Italy is Rome. The American obsession with Rome exists because in its cultural imagination America sees itself as the modern day Roman Empire. But Americans are more ambivalent about the other Romes, namely Papal Rome. Historically there has been a great Protestant American fear of Irish and Italian immigrants destroying American democracy through Catholic Papal influence. And while American tourists love to stare at the wonderful artwork in the Vatican, we still tend to feel sick about the excesses of gold on the walls. The current Rome, modern Rome, is completely ignored by American tourists.

Another city Americans love to visit is Florence, home of the Renaissance. Here they can see the works of Leonardo Da Vinci, Michelangelo, Donatello and Raphael (before they became Ninja Turtles). The city was also the home of writers Dante Alighieri (who told us what hell would be like) and Machiavelli (who told us what to do to get to hell).

The other great achievement Americans recognize is Italian automobiles. The main manufactures are Alfa Romeo in Milan, Ferrari in Maranello and Fiat in Turin. Milan is also one of the four international centers of fashion (the other are New York, London and Paris).

One of the biggest influences on the Italian stereotype is the Mafia, a series of organized crime families. Although crime organizations exist across the south of Italy (like the Camorra in Naples and the ‘Ndrangheta in Calabria) the Cosa Nostra is the most important because the Sicilian immigrants replicated in America those same organizations. They even went so far as to travel back and forth between America and Sicily, organizing elaborate international smuggling routes as they went.

Italy is a regional place and as more American tourists go there the impressions they bring back to America will undoubtedly change the stereotype. But I firmly believe that Americans think and vote with their stomach, and the food Americans and the World now recognizes as Italian is undoubtedly Neapolitan in origin. For that reason, I say that Naples (not Rome, Venice, Florence, Milan or Palermo) is at the center of the Italian stereotype.

Like I said before, the stereotype is a tool to quickly categorize large groups of people. Ultimately its propose is to build up a shared set of assumptions and feelings so that when I say ‘a German, an Englishman, a Frenchman, an Italian and a Russian walked into a bar’ you can all try to guess what’s coming next. Because that’s what the stereotype is all about: good comedy.
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:iconpolandmaster:
PolandMaster Featured By Owner Feb 9, 2017  Hobbyist Traditional Artist
Communist, nazis and traitors.
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:iconarminius1871:
Arminius1871 Featured By Owner Apr 6, 2017
Sad if that´s all you think about when seeing those countries.
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:iconpolandmaster:
PolandMaster Featured By Owner Apr 6, 2017  Hobbyist Traditional Artist
That true
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:icontaranalynartzx3:
TaranalynArtzx3 Featured By Owner Jan 28, 2017  Hobbyist Digital Artist
Was I the only one that thought 'wOA THAT'S A LONG DESCRiPtION'
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:iconkyrtuck:
kyrtuck Featured By Owner Dec 15, 2016  Hobbyist General Artist
Yeah, its always those that get all the attention.


I'm more curious about all the European countries we don't hear about.
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:iconsephiroth-ascension:
Sephiroth-Ascension Featured By Owner Aug 26, 2016  Hobbyist Traditional Artist
I am italian, and I must tell you that: your italian stereotype is from Venice, not Naples.

Bye :-)
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:iconletsanimateit88:
LetsAnimateIt88 Featured By Owner Sep 8, 2016  Hobbyist Digital Artist
correct, I'm from Naples
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:iconlordelthibar:
LordElthibar Featured By Owner May 18, 2016
Dang stereotypes! Smash stereotypes!
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:iconaileea:
Aileea Featured By Owner Mar 12, 2016
Interesting!
As a Bavarian from the outskirts of Munich, I eypecially find the stereotypes about Bavaria interesting as well as amusing.
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:iconoddgarfield:
OddGarfield Featured By Owner Feb 27, 2016  Student
You should have done the German holding a beer with a Beerfest girl.
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:iconmaine86:
Maine86 Featured By Owner Jan 16, 2016
A stereotype is supposed to be a bit true. But what the Americans think about the French is so wrong and annoying. I spend half of the year in Asia and the French expat community always runs away from the US expat community.
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:iconshimazun:
Shimazun Featured By Owner Nov 11, 2015  Hobbyist Digital Artist
As a german I must agree, the only things that have something to do with germany in the internet are either naziland or beerland -stuff . At least what I've seen so far
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:icondisstrack:
Disstrack Featured By Owner Dec 19, 2015
and carland!
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:iconchaoscrash13:
ChaosCrash13 Featured By Owner Oct 30, 2015
Англосакс, его нацистский бред и недоумение по поводу того, что его нахуй посылают. Где-то я это уже видел... Лет последние этак тысячу.
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:iconraph78:
raph78 Featured By Owner Oct 22, 2015
I'm British and British people don't actually dress that way and not all British people like tea
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:iconsergeantslime:
SergeantSlime Featured By Owner Oct 8, 2015
Oooooh so le miaaaaa
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:iconizzie-the-obsesser:
Izzie-the-Obsesser Featured By Owner Apr 16, 2015  Hobbyist General Artist
Hetalia brought me here... (PLEASE DON'T KILL ME)
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:iconmagicflandust:
MagicFlanDust Featured By Owner Edited May 5, 2015
Same here xD
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:iconizzie-the-obsesser:
Izzie-the-Obsesser Featured By Owner May 5, 2015  Hobbyist General Artist
Yush!
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:icongrechka34:
Grechka34 Featured By Owner Jul 21, 2014
Hahah I don't know really did Russia want to take over the world. When I read some works of Russian thinkers of 19 centuryI didn't find any "we are the best and others must bow us and be part of Great Russia ho-ho." The most interesting project was to take Constantinople from Ottoman Empire and to make it centre of all Slavs (Panslavism was one of the most popular ideas in Russian empire) but what's about Austria, France, British Empire, Prussia and others. But may be British empire was right about Russian ambitions. Here looking at British Empire just recall that thief is the man who loudly screams "Catch a thief!"
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:iconhillfighter:
Hillfighter Featured By Owner Jul 22, 2014
It's essentially early 19th century British propaganda. Following the Treaty of Tilsit in 1807 they thought that Napoleon had schemed with Tsar Alexander to take British India. They also believed a rumor that on his deathbed Peter the Great had revealed to Catherine I that Russia had a destiny to rule the entire world.

British fears mainly stemmed from the fear that the Russians would invade India.
hillfighter.deviantart.com/art…
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:iconcargirl9:
cargirl9 Featured By Owner Apr 22, 2014
And what does americans think of Swedish Peoples? That we are all blond or heavy metal fans or viking dudes?
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:iconhillfighter:
Hillfighter Featured By Owner Apr 23, 2014
It probably depends where you go in the US. Most Americans tend to blend Sweden together with Norway and Denmark. Some of us also don't travel too much so our only expose to you is from Volvo, IKEA and LEGO (actually Danish). Also we Americans tend to eat alot, so we know about Swedish meatballs and Swedish fish but not smorasboard.

To be honest, I'm not sure we have a stereotype for you. I mean some people probably saw Sweden for the first time through the movie The Girl with the Dragon Tattoo but I really hope that they don't get the wrong idea about your country.
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:iconcargirl9:
cargirl9 Featured By Owner Apr 23, 2014
Me neither. Well i meet some americans once and they thougth we all was heavy metal fans because of the swedish rock festival and our rock band sabaton
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:iconhelheimsshaman:
HelheimsShaman Featured By Owner Apr 12, 2014  Hobbyist Writer
Seems like you've been quite indoctrinated by mainstream, "official" belief systems, and you aren't even aware of it.
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:iconhillfighter:
Hillfighter Featured By Owner Apr 12, 2014
I wrote this document three years ago in order to explain my ideas regarding the place of Europeans in the American imagination. It was not and does not reflect my personal ideas regarding Europeans.

My understanding at this time is that the Europe is far more complex than even the most educated American's ability to grasp. Others are correct when they say that the study of history really only scratches the surface.

Even my more honest attempts at describing history are very much flawed. hillfighter.deviantart.com/art…
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:iconhelheimsshaman:
HelheimsShaman Featured By Owner Apr 12, 2014  Hobbyist Writer
You know, after I wrote that comment it occurred to me that I sounded kind of nasty and I did not mean it that way! I was in a hurry trying to get through my deviations for the day and didn't explain myself very well.

I had gotten the impression that it wasn't a recent work, and I meant that it was not reflective of what you probably know now, but what you knew back then. And it is a very good work of summarizing what people think about the various nationalities. I live in the US, in the Midwest in a small town, and I bet you most people around me who would read your deviation would say "Why yes, that's the way it really is, isn't it" A lot of our views of other countries seem to come from Hollywood and TV. I think when people travel the begin to learn more^^
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:iconhillfighter:
Hillfighter Featured By Owner Apr 12, 2014
I suppose there's always misconceptions and assumptions whenever anyone discusses anything.

Speaking of stereotypes, I've never been to the Midwest. The closest was a trip to Yellowstone. Most TV and print seems to associate the area only with corn, though a number of old History channel episodes regarding the beer-barons of the 19th Century spring to mind rather readily.

I suppose you might have a few thoughts regarding California.
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:iconhelheimsshaman:
HelheimsShaman Featured By Owner Apr 13, 2014  Hobbyist Writer
You are correct about the cornfields and beer brewereies! When I was young I used to think that I hated it all. It seemed boring and almost like a wasteland in a way. But now that I'm older (53), I appreciate all of the good things about the Midwest: the openness and honesty, the friendliness, traditional values, et cetera. If I had wanted to, I could have lived in Chicago or Long Beach, California but after staying in those places for a while I really wanted to come back here. Ideally, I'd like to live in Germany or Britain or Ireland, but as an American, trying to relocate to Europe can be super-difficult.

I liked California very much at first, but there were two negative issues with my situation and that ruined it all. I didn't have enough money, and I was staying with an Uncle who ended up being an extremely annoying drunk who ruined my attempts at having a nice three month vacation. When the three months were over, I was really happy to get back to Illinois. The weather, the ocean, the architecture, all of it seemed really alien. And growing up in a very homogenous region with mainly white people of German/English/Irish/Dutch ancestry, all of the Latino,African-American and Asian people made me feel totally out-of-place. And I don't mean anything racist by that at all.I met lots of great people of all colors; but it was something I was not used to coming from a small Illinois town where everyone looked like my family! In general, the people did not seem as open and friendly though as in the Midwest, and they seemed really pre-occupied with money and being trendy. When the neighbors there and the people I met found out I was from a little town in Illinois, they kept putting me down and talking to me like I was an imbecile,lol. They kept wanting to tell me how to dress, wear my hair, what music to listen to, et cetera. But I still had a good time out there, and I think if I went back now it would be different for me. I only stayed in Southern California too; I'd love to see San Francisco and up north in the mountains.
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:iconhillfighter:
Hillfighter Featured By Owner Apr 13, 2014
The last time I was in LA was over seven years ago. I'm 24 now. There's something rather fishy about LA. According to Kevin Starr's book California, SF, LA and San Diego all had buildings created in the early 20th Century that would define the character of the city in question.

San Francisco styled itself as a Greco-Roman city dedicated to higher learning. en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Panama&n…

San Diego styled itself as a wonderful port city like Naples or Rio. en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Panama-C…

Los Angeles styled itself as Babylon on the Pacific, a nexus of exotic wealth and power. en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Los_Ange…

I think Northern California is nicer, but it's also weird in its own ways. SF always seems to gather people who think differently, for better or for worse. en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Emperor_…

There's a lot of small towns north of Sacramento and Santa Rosa that I think are more down to earth. I haven't visited any recently so I can't say much more.
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:iconhelheimsshaman:
HelheimsShaman Featured By Owner Apr 14, 2014  Hobbyist Writer
Thanks for those links! I have a friend who's moving to California so I'll share those with her^^
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:iconserahne:
Serahne Featured By Owner Jan 23, 2014
As French i think it's funny as hell :P I don't have the same clichés about the others countries, thus it is REALLY interesting :) I just try to no forget that only a handful of americans think these stereotypes really applies ^^
( and, god, why do you think we hate americans ? Parisians hate everbody, so it does not count ! )
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:iconhillfighter:
Hillfighter Featured By Owner Jan 24, 2014
Lol, I wrote this thing a little over 3 years ago.

I think the Parisian thing is a matter of perspective. Most tourists don't talk to other tourists, so they might not know that everyone is treated equally with distain by the locals.
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:iconherobrineofasia:
HerobrineOfAsia Featured By Owner Dec 13, 2013

WOW a lot of typing

You must be a very devoted deviant, 对不对?

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:iconorangesplash365:
OrangeSplash365 Featured By Owner Oct 23, 2013  Hobbyist General Artist
I think stereotypes are funny, but you shouldn't take them seriously. Categorizing people from another country is silly because everyone, no matter where you are from, has their own style and personality that inevitably clashes with the stereotype of their country. Even American's have a stereotype that people from other countries believe to be true, I guess it all boils down to who really wants to believe the truth about a culture and who just wants to make fun of it.
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:iconwhiteangelwolf1:
WhiteAngelWolf1 Featured By Owner Oct 15, 2013  Hobbyist Writer
I tip my hat to you good sir, excellent work! :iconfavoriteplz:
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:iconshirk24:
Shirk24 Featured By Owner Sep 23, 2013
As a german, I can only agree to the part about germany.

Well done!
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:iconexperimentalacc:
experimentalacc Featured By Owner Aug 20, 2013  Hobbyist General Artist
i hate what americans think about us italians
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:iconherobrineofasia:
HerobrineOfAsia Featured By Owner Dec 13, 2013
well I hate what those americans think of Asia!
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:iconexperimentalacc:
experimentalacc Featured By Owner Dec 19, 2013  Hobbyist General Artist
u know what they think, is rubbish
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:icondrbarber101:
DrBarber101 Featured By Owner Apr 11, 2014  Hobbyist Digital Artist
I hate what those asians and italians think of Americans! XD JK JK JK
 
Because "those" American's don't define all us Americans. :facepalm: 
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:iconhillfighter:
Hillfighter Featured By Owner Aug 26, 2013
Breaking the stereotype would require large numbers of Americans to either visit Italy in person or else see on TV shows and in movies an image of Italy qualitatively different than previously believed.
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:iconpolymetros:
Polymetros Featured By Owner Jun 11, 2013  Hobbyist General Artist
they a!! white
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:iconkimjongangryplz:
kimjongangryplz Featured By Owner May 8, 2016
So...
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:iconalicesacco:
AliceSacco Featured By Owner Apr 29, 2013   Digital Artist
My mom think the same about Naples=italian stereotipes, and we live in Italy.

I never visited Palermo and Rome, but Venice, Florence and Milan are totally different. They seems almost cities of three different countries.
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:iconalicesacco:
AliceSacco Featured By Owner Apr 29, 2013   Digital Artist
Naples? But you drew a gondolier, and gondoliers are from Venice.
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:iconarcadianemperor:
arcadianemperor Featured By Owner Jan 26, 2013  Hobbyist Traditional Artist
Ehm... The song is "O sole mio", and "Fuliculì, fuliculà"...
^^'
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:iconherobrineofasia:
HerobrineOfAsia Featured By Owner Dec 13, 2013
oh you mean the italian mountain-train song?
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:iconarcadianemperor:
arcadianemperor Featured By Owner Dec 14, 2013  Hobbyist Traditional Artist
Ehm... No... I mean the two neapolitan songs... O sole mio (oh my sun) and Fuliculì fuliculà (I can't translate it because I don't know what it means)!!!
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:iconblackoutrogue:
Blackoutrogue Featured By Owner Jan 11, 2013
well,all i can say to clear the russian stereotype is that we used to be very religious people and from the beginning we were taught to live as our conscience, religion and our loyalties say,without thinking about profit for ourselves,obsessed with idea of the "great good" we add to by doing the right things,and maybe because we always think that the other peoples will betray us formed a protective wall of this "cold attitude".
yeah,i know it's paranoid but russia used to be alone in all eras and nothing good ever came from outside of our borders.it was proven yet again by churchill's "iron curtain" speach in fulton,we concidered americans and british our allies before, despite all our differences.

at least it was that way up to the end of 20th century.the mass culture of the west and corruption in our own ranks made russia a very dark place today.in the ussr most people knew for sure that if they really work well they will have free roof above their head,they will not suffer the food\medicine shortage and they knew for sure that they'll live their lives in decent conditions when they become old,they did not fear the policemen,it was an honorable job,and in essence all the state workers were honorable people. well,you won't see any of it today, it's all reversed now.russia as most of the world knew it died in 1991.
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January 7, 2011
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